Women’s Resistance to Feminism(s) in the United States since the 19th century

Publié le 9 mars par Institut du genre

From the 1911 National Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage to Phyllis Schlafly’s “STOP-ERA” campaign in the 1980s and governor Kay Ivey’s recent signing into law of House Bill 314 criminalizing abortion in Alabama, women have played a prominent role in opposing feminism in the US. Yet these visible forms of anti feminism are but the tips of a much larger iceberg of women’s resistance to feminism that this two-day conference, organized by the “Women and the F-Word” team (https://wfw.hypotheses.org), proposes to explore.

The notion of women’s resistance to feminism includes—but is not reduced to—organized antifeminism, a countermovement which has been the object of pioneering work. Resistance is understood as a broad set of negative reactions experienced and/or expressed by women or groups of women when they are faced with self-styled feminist behaviors, ideas or actions. As feminism is conceived as a flexible and evolving ideology, which the plural “feminisms” more adequately reflects, the modes and mechanisms of resistance will be examined from a diachronic and dialogical perspective that always takes into account the particular historical moment.

This interdisciplinary conference means to bring together contributions shedding light on the specific features of women’s resistance to feminisms in the United States since the 19th century.

Place and date of the conference :
Aix-Marseille University
29 avenue Robert Schuman
13621 Aix-en-Provence
France
April 3-4, 2020

Program