Nineteenth Century British Social Science and the Exclusion of Women from Politics

Publié le 4 octobre par Equipe GIS IdG

Séminaire « histoire du politique », LARCA

Université Paris Diderot, Bâtiment Olympe de Gouges, place Paul Ricœur, 75013

7 octobre 2016, 15h-17h, salle 204
Ann Towns, University of Goteborg, Sweden

“Nineteenth Century British Social Science and the Exclusion of Women from Politics”

This seminar explores nineteenth century ideas - particularly but not exclusively of British scholars - about the relation between the political condition of women and civilization, focusing on articulations by a range of European natural and social scientists (including Darwin, Spencer and Marx). As the European sciences developed in the nineteenth century, so did ideas about men and women and their proper political roles in so-called “civilized” states. In short, the political status of women functioned as an arena of contestation in which alternative visions of a good society were debated. In contrast with today, the alleged link between sexual equality and “Western civilization” was highly disputed in the nineteenth century. The seminar ends with a brief discussion of contemporary ideas about the status of women as a standard of civilization.

Contact : myriam.boussahba-bravard@univ-paris-diderot.fr